Paws Need Claws

Paws Need Claws-DO NOT DECLAW

Mojo’s Hope has a very clear and strong position when it comes to cats keeping their claws. We are adamantly opposed to declawing. It is barbaric, cruel, and has proven to cause long-term negative effects on the cat’s body and emotional well-being.  Our adoption application asks several questions about declawing and our updated agreements have an additional clause that the adoptive family signs. The clause states very clearly that they agree to reach out to MH if behavior concerns arise and that they are never to declaw the cat.
When you choose to adopt a cat from us, you agree to NEVER declaw the cat. It is a discussion we have through the adoption process as well. We offer behavior supports and more throughout the lifetime of the cat. If the cat that was adopted from us begins to exhibit behaviors that cause the adoptive family concerns, they are to contact us immediately for our support. If the adoptive family has not found a humane solution, the cat is to be surrendered back to us. If Mojo’s Hope is notified that one of our adopted cats has been declawed, the adoption agreement is dissolved, ownership of the cat is reverted back to Mojo’s Hope and the cat is to be returned to us immediately.

We are seeking out support from our fellow animal welfare community about how to further spread the word about the negative ramifications of declawing and what we can do collaboratively from a more proactive standpoint to prevent other cats from unnecessary suffering. Our partner organization’s Alaska’s KAAATs brochure, Paws Need Claws, is available to download for free and offer to adoptive families, vet clinics and all pet facilities.

We would also like to open communications with all veterinary clinics around Alaska and request that if/when they have a client that comes in to have their cat declawed, along with their thorough questioning and paths to humane solutions, that the vet clinic is to find out where the cat was adopted from, what the policy is of that organization/facility and ensure that contact is made to prevent unnecessary suffering.

Resources:

The Paw Project